How to know when it's time for roof replacement

How to Know When It’s Time for Roof Replacement

Roof Replacement Is Inevitable

The roof is an essential part of your house. It makes the house livable. (Without a roof, you might just as well be living outdoors, right?) It protects every part of the structure underneath and your possessions within from the elements that would otherwise damage them. It keeps out bugs and animals like squirrels and bats. It holds in the warm air that comes from your furnace to keep the house from getting chilly and to keep your utility bills down.

Unfortunately, every roof deteriorates in the face of weather and time. On average, an average shingle roof is good for 15 to 25 years, and then you need a new roof.

How to know when it's time for roof replacement

But despite the face that getting a new roof is necessary from time to time, some of us are inclined to put it

Why Do We Put Off Roof Replacement?

There are a couple reasons why homeowners put off getting a new roof.

One is roof replacement cost. New roof cost varies from one job to the next. Larger areas are more expensive to cover than smaller ones. The complexity of the space to be covered comes into your new roof estimate too. Features like gables and dormers can make the roofers’ job more complicated and increase the price. Then there’s the roofing material you choose. Shingles, tile, and metal vary in cost just as they vary in appearance, durability, and other variables. But whatever the details of your particular situation, you can expect roof replacement cost to be a considerable expense.

Homeowners may also balk at the hassle or the expectation of hassle. They begrudge the time required to find a reputable roofing company, choose a material, and negotiate price. They think the sound of roofers walking around overhead using their tools will prove to be annoying.

So it’s fairly common to put off roof replacement, possibly with some patchwork to tide you over in the meantime. But procrastination and patchwork will only get you so far. Here are three indicators that the time for roof replacement really is at hand.

Roof Replacement Indicator #1: The Roof is Over 20 Years Old

As mentioned above, in virtually all cases, the maximum lifespan of a roof is 25 years.  As that’s the maximum, many a roof won’t last that long. Accordingly, when you hit the 20-year mark, you should at least have a roofing company make an inspection even if there’s no visible damage. Be prepared for the bad news that yes, it is indeed time for a new roof.

Roof Replacement Indicator #1: Your Shingles Have Deteriorated

Naturally, to determine this, you (or somebody else, if you’re not physically capable of doing it safely or are uncomfortable with heights) will need to get up on the roof and take a good close look at the shingles. Homeowners should make such an inspection a couple times a year.

Are any shingles cracked or curled up at the edges? Are some cupped, buckling, or actually missing? Do you see moss growing on them?

Those are all warning signs that it’s time for a new roof. Of course, that may not be the case if you only see a couple defective shingles. In that case, you can probably get away with simply replacing them. But if the problem is more widespread, call a roofing company.

Roof Replacement Indicator #3: The Sun Is Shining In Where It Shouldn’t

Go up in the attic. Is the space brighter than it used to be? Can you actually see sunlight shining through the roof boards? If so, that’s a clear indication that you need a new roof.

You may be thinking that if you see light shining through gaps in the roof, of course you need a new one. But this indicator is worth mentioning because many homeowners don’t get up in the attic very often. It’s worth visiting and inspecting every part of your house every month to keep home repair issues from sneaking up on you.

When roof replacement is in the offing, we hope you’ll contact Stay Dry Roofing, the roofing repair and replacement experts. We provide free estimates and can handle any job in Indianapolis and through the Midwest.

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